Attendant Power Assist! The Viamobile

Hello Everyone! Happy Wednesday! Can you believe August is coming to an end? My, my this summer has gone by quickly! I have a few exciting announcements to make. Access Community Therapists Ltd has two upcoming courses: The Pressure is On: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Pressure Management in the Community on November 7th and 8th and Wheelchair Seating & Positioning: Practical Applications on November 28th and 29th. To register, please visit the Access website and fill out the registration form. Both courses are highly interactive and offer hands on experience with clients. Check out some photos of the seating course here! Hope to see you there!

Now, onto some new rehab stuff! I just set-up an attendant power assist on a manual tilt-in-space wheelchair called the VIAMOBILE (by invacare). There actually isn’t much information online about this product, which was surprising to me. The system is comprised of a remote handle that turns the system on and off and powers the motor to either roll forwards or backwards. When the system is turned on, the centre wheel drops onto the ground. This offloads the rear wheels, which can tilt the system a bit forwards. Luckily we were working with a tilt-in-space wheelchair. That way, the client can be tilted slightly when the system is on.  Here are some photos of the system:

Invacare has just revised this product and it is now super easy to remove and set-up. I love that it can be so easily removed. My client who needed it, manually-self propels indoors, but lives in a very hilly neighborhood and his caregivers were having a lot of trouble getting him around the community. Because he manually self-propels, we needed to keep the wheelchair light. By removing the motor of the viamobile when indoors allowed us to do that. The viamobile was set up on a Quickie Iris manual tilt wheelchair. See some images below.

This system is by no means cheap. Many funding agencies such as Ministry will not fund this system. You may have to look for private funds for a system like this, which is definitely a downside. On a brighter note, an attendant power assist can be extremely useful to prevent caregiver injuries as well as to enable your clients to get out more often in the community. Definitely worth while, if you can find funding. This system was set-up by Jody Mair and Nathan Buskell at Motion Specialties. Thanks to you both for setting this up! Until next time!

Seating is Super!

Cheryl

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Balancing Function and Posture. Custom Seating and Manual Wheelchairs

Happy Friday Everyone! It’s almost the weekend! Just wanted to share with you a system I finished for a client with Spina Bifida. This client self-propels around indoors, but also needed a system that would be caregiver friendly and could fold AND could also accommodate custom seating components. We selected the Quickie 2 wheelchair base as it was lightweight, but could still fold. The Quickie 2 is a versatile wheelchair that has adjustable centre of gravity, various castor sizes and seat to floor height options, angle and depth adjustable back canes, and armrest options. Because of the range of options, this wheelchair is therefore a nice light weight choice that can accommodate various seating components, which came in handy for this client. This wheelchair was provided by Motion Specialties.

Here are a couple of images from the fabrication process:

With regards to the seating, we created a custom contoured backrest shell and did a foam-in-place insert. See here for more information on custom seating techniques. A custom shell backrest was selected because my client’s trunk was quite short due to her scoliosis and severe lordosis. With this custom shell, we were able to create a very deep contour with the laterals but were also able to flare the bottom to clear her thighs and trim the top to allow for scapular clearance and improved self-propelling. The shell backrest is also quite light weight, which is important for any self-propeller! We then did a carved foam seat with sensus foam ischial well for increased comfort and also created contouring for her thighs. This provided stability as well as comfort for the client. One issue that came up, was when we improved her posture and trunk alignment, we accidentally brought her up too high to reach her wheels. Oops! In order to fix this, we actually cut out the sides of the cushion and dropped the cushion/seat  between the seat canes to bring her back closer to her hand rims. Phew! crisis averted! Thanks to Chad at Ability Health Care for completing the seating for this system.

Well that’s all for today! Time to enjoy the weekend. Thanks for checking in today!

Seating is Super!

Cheryl